Tag - fellowship

Fellows walk away with unparalleled knowledge and experiences

After a fruitful Fellowship programme, the Fellows bid goodbye to Rome and head back to their communities with unforgettable memories, knowledge and experiences. A couple of months back, four Fellows, from 3 different countries, representing 4 different matrifocal communities, embarked on a journey of sharing their indigenous stories and learning about tools for the revitalisation of their communities and indigenous food systems. Aided by TIP’s Youth Fellowship Programme, the Fellows gained unique international and intercultural experiences and skills to add [...]

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Gen-Y of matriarchal societies to shape and revitalise their Indigenous Food Systems

As part of the Fellowship Programme, on 10th July, 2019, the Fellows visited the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Headquarters in Rome, to share their case studies about renewal and enhancement of their indigenous food systems, which they formulated with the help of the training they received over 2 months. Owing to the uniqueness of a matriarchal society, the German Room at the FAO Headquarters was fully packed with participants from Bioversity International, FAO and IFAD, to learn about [...]

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A day at the WFP Headquarters: Fellows gain insights about nutrition in conflict-ridden areas

The Fellows visited the World Food Programme (WFP) headquarters to have a closer look at the work done by WFP  and to understand how humanitarian UN Agencies like the WFP work in disaster prone and conflict-ridden areas. At WFP, they met Uma Thapa, Senior Government Partnership Officer, who briefly described the different activities carried out by WFP, particularly in the area of nutrition. (L-R) Lukas Pawera, Phrang Roy, Merrysha Nongrum, Chenxiang Marak, Edgar Monte, Pius Ranee and Yani Nofri at [...]

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The Fellows formulated community-specific work plans based on the VIPP methodology

Learning through personal experiences and resources always goes down better as compared to a one-way training. Over the span of 2 days, VIPP facilitator and trainer,  Timmi Tillmann, interacted with the Fellows and trained them on the Visualisation in Participatory Programme (VIPP) via exercises that involved Fellows sharing their individual experiences and knowledge. This was then used to formulate work plans for indigenous food systems, specific to the Fellows’ respective communities. The interactive and fun learning session made it [...]

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Designing a roadmap to funding with the aid of the concept of systems thinking

Over the 3-day long session, the Fellows were oriented on the concept of system thinking and logframe training that they can take back to their respective communities, to design impactful roadmaps which would generate funding. Essentially, the aim of the session was to train the Fellows to put down their ideas in such a manner that they get due recognition and funds required to bring those ideas into execution, which would aid in bringing about positive changes in their [...]

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Day 8 in Rome: Fellows learn the value chain approach to promote NUS products

Neglected and Underutilised Species (NUS) have been overlooked by research and policy makers over crops that have greater demand. Negligence in provision of resources for their promotion and development results in farmers planting them less often and also leads to loss of traditional knowledge. Producer who promotes NUS products (Campgna Amica Farmers’ Market) The potential of NUS should be recognised. They can help to increase the diversification of food production which in turn diversifies nutritional intake. In addition to this, they [...]

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Day 7 in Rome: The Fellows are inundated about indigenous peoples’ rights

The local and indigenous communities and farmers of all regions of the world have made enormous contributions to food and agriculture production throughout the world. However, the indigenous peoples often share a colonial legacy of marginalisation and dispossession; they struggle to reconcile the usually conflicting demands of tradition and modernity. But, today, the rights of indigenous peoples are being taken into consideration as a result of sustained resistance by the people themselves and the mediation of a concerned and politically [...]

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Day 6 in Rome: Fellows identify around 12 wild edible plants during an ABD walk

On 26th June, 2019, the Fellows, along with their new found friends in Rome, went for an agrobiodiversity walk to Giulianello which is 51 kms away from Rome. This session was specifically designed as part of the training session under the leadership of Martina, who is working at Bioversity International. Iseno Tamburlani, a knowledge holder of Giulianello took the team for a walk into their landscapes. During the walks, they identified around 12 wild edible plants.Members present: Yani Nofri, TIP [...]

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Day 5 in Rome: The Fellows learnt about the promotion of neglected & underutilised species

A sharing session on Neglected and Underutlised Species (NUS) and Biodiversity for Food and Nutrition (BFN) was held on 25th June at Bioversity International, Rome, to learn how to identify and promote neglected and underutilised species with focus on nutrition.Members present: Phrang Roy, TIP Coordinator,India Andrea Selva, TIP Assistant, Italy Yani Nofri, TIP fellow, Indonesia Chenxiang Marak, TIP Fellow, India Edgar Monte, TIP Fellow, Mexico Merrysha Nongrum, TIP Fellow, India Pius Ranee, Ex-TIP Fellow and TIP Consultant Martina, Intern, Bioversity International Arturo Turillazzi, Intern, Bioversity International Claudia Heindorf, Phd [...]

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Day 4 in Rome: Session on landscape approaches for biodiversity conservation and livelihoods improvements

As part of the Fellowship programme, Fellows were asked to profile their own indigenous food systems before they come for the training both in India and Rome. While conducting this exercise, one of the tools that they applied was to make a village map that enabled them to understand the different land use systems. In the process, the Fellows found it quite difficult to make an assessment of their own indigenous food systems on whether their systems are resilient [...]

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